You Won’t Believe This…But It Is Absolutely TRUE.

I blogged earlier about the unimaginable power the Nevada Department of Corrections has to increase prison time, to punish inmates beyond a judge’s sentence, and I wanted to give a bit more detail.

First, let me start by saying that I never thought I would be in the position to be writing such a blog, or about any such subject matter – because I simply had no idea that things like this went on.  All three of my siblings have been incarcerated at one time or another, mainly for drug-related crimes, but I had no idea how serious and severe the miscarriage of justice is – and it is ongoing.

Tonight, I talked to my sweetheart.  He has been under an extreme amount of stress lately because of a turn of events at the prison.  If you’ll recall from my earlier blog, he and several other inmates are being punished for having graduated high school; inmates cannot attend Vocational Education if they have a high school diploma.  Therefore, those who were enrolled in the program (including my man) and who had already earned meritorious credit for such, which would have decreased their time in prison – but only if they complete the program, have LOST that time.

To exacerbate this problem is the additional bombshell for my babe that if he does not get a job IMMEDIATELY, he will be dropped to Level 2.  That is a tremendous punishment, in that it means being locked in his cell for more than half the day, having extremely limited phone time, and time ADDED to his sentence.  Yes, that’s what they will do.

Now, if this next bit wasn’t so horrific, it would be funny: my man cannot have a job (he has repeatedly tried and been denied) because he has a leg injury – WHICH THE PRISON WILL NOT TREAT HIM FOR, as well as high blood pressure – WHICH THE PRISON WITHHELD HIS PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION FOR UNTIL I CALLED THE NDOC AND COMPLAINED.  That same evening, after 7 weeks of going without it, he was finally given his medication – but only part of it; he needs two prescriptions, but was given only one.

This is the same bullshit that the Parole Board did to him when he went before them  in June.  He was punished for not having attended any “programming,” yet “programming” is not offered to him because he is in Medium Security.  He asked for an in-cell study program, but was refused.  He asked for a “classification reduction” but was again refused.  He challenged his classification but was told by his caseworker that he cannot challenge unless his sentence gets reduced, or some other bullshit.

On top of all of this, the PSI report (Pre-Sentence Investigation report) that was used when he was sentenced is INCORRECT; this is not something you, dear reader, will be unfamiliar with, if you have spent any time reading blogs regarding PSI reports.  They are notoriously full of errors, yet prisoners are essentially powerless to do anything about them or to have them changed.  Even getting your hands on a copy of one seems to be an insurmountable obstacle.

What causes so much grief for me about this whole situation, aside from the obvious, is that people know this stuff is going on.  The Governer knows, the ACLU knows, the media have published reports and articles about it – there are huge groups of people who are fully aware of the serious and ongoing human rights violations, Constitutional violations, etc., yet nothing changes.  NOTHING.  How can so many people know and be able to do nothing?  Meanwhile, so many people are suffering intensely behind bars in Nevada.  What can I do?  What can anyone do?

I cannot fathom the grotesque carnival of horror that the man I love is being subjected to on a daily basis.  Not only the emotional and mental strain of it, but the physical pain, too: he is not ablet to sleep because of the pain in his injured knee, and he cannot eat because the “food” makes him sick and is notoriously “not fit for human consumption.”  And now the prison has the power to add time to his sentence to force him to stay there even longer, simply because he cannot get a job – because they will not allow him to have one?  It’s a Catch-22 of the worst and most horrific magnitude.

There is so much more to this story, and I will write more later.  For now, I need to try to un-kink my brain and try to wrap it around this nightmare so I can figure out what to do next to effect some sort of change – something far greater people than I have tried and failed to do so far.  But that doesn’t mean that I am going to give up.  Because I’m not.  I don’t know how I’m going to do this, but I AM going to do this.  I hope you’ll help me; there’s power in numbers…

You Won’t Believe This…But It Is Absolutely TRUE.

Kristina Wildeveld

I am thrilled to confirm that, as of this moment,  attorney Kristina Widevelde does, in fact, handle parole denial appeal cases.  I know this because I just called her office to make sure, prior to our appointment next week; I would not have liked to pay the pricey consultation fee only to be told that she doesn’t handle our particular action.  I mean, she is certainly not the most expensive attorney in Las Vegas but the cost of the consultation is a bit of a chunk.   That said, I am not complaining about it, since she is absolutely worth the price.

I am delighted and thrilled that she does handle parole denial appeal cases, despite the fact that her website does not specifically list that as one of her practices.  I also want to publicly thank her office staff for their kindness and patience; this is a very emotional, trying experience for me, and I have had lots of questions, as well as the need to reschedule twice.  Ms. Wildeveld’s staff has always been courteous, professional and understanding;  I really appreciate that.

So if you or your loved one find yourself/yourselves in the position of wanting to appeal a parole denial, call Kristina Wildeveld’s office with confidence.  She may not even agree to take our case, but knowing she will at least meet with us to discuss our options, etc. gives me great hope.

Kristina Wildeveld

I Am A Knight

Sometimes, I wake up crying. Sometimes, I go to sleep crying; loving someone who is in prison is extremely difficult and painful. I told him this morning that nothing could be harder; even if he was ill and in the hospital, at least I could be by his side to keep him company, watch him sleep and just be there to try to soothe his pain and assuage his fears.  And death, as devastating as it is, at least has some finality to it; the person is gone, and I have to accept that I will never see or speak to that person again so I can start to heal and move on with my life. But loving someone in prison is continual torture, because I can hear him, and I know he’s there, but I can’t see him or be with him. And I know that he is siffering every minute of every day, and I am almost powerless to do anything about it. *Almost.* I am fighting with everything I have, and with every bit of my strength and determination. I will not give up. And I will not stop loving him. I know there will be more oceans of tears to cry for the loneliness, the desolation and despair, but I also know that this distance and separation will also eventually come to an end and he will be free, and knowing that – along with knowing how worth it he is – will keep me going.

I will not give up, and I will not leave. I love him, and I will fight for justice on his behalf, and for his freedom. I was born for this; this is my cause, and what all of the experiences in my life so far have been leading up to. Even in my weakness and tiredness, I feel very strong and energized. I also really miss my dad; he would know just what to say to keep me encouraged. He would tell me “You’re a Knight,” and I know exactly what that means, not only as far as the namesake, but as what Knights actually are: warriors.

This Knight Will Fight. ❤

I Am A Knight

Insanity

Go to Question 3 regarding “Reasonable Notice.”  Read the question and the analysis, and tell me how that could possibly be fair, or reasonable, or could make sense to anyone.  Clearly, this is set up to avoid any kind of oversight or discipline for not following laws and guidelines:

http://www.leg.state.nv.us/74th/Interim_Agendas_Minutes_Exhibits/Exhibits/AdminJustice/E091207G.pdf

Insanity

Releasing Low Risk, Elderly (50+) Prisoners Would Save Billions

Another report by the ACLUNV:

http://www.aclunv.org/press/releasing-low-risk-elderly-50-prisoners-would-save-billions

Releasing Low Risk, Elderly (50+) Prisoners Would Save Billions

Nevada Board of Parole

If you have to deal with these creatures, or if you have any reason for calling the Las Vegas office, try to avoid speaking to Brittney.

I called there just this morning to get clarification on why Tracy has been told by his caseworker – and why I was told by Rhonda Larson in the Division of Offender Management (Family and Friends) – that his parole has been denied, yet when I spoke to someone at the Las Vegas office of the parole board last week, I was told that a decision hadn’t been made yet and that his case was still missing a vote.

Rhonda returned my call early this morning, since I had left her a message last Friday asking when that information (the parole denial) was entered into her system, and when we spoke today, she told me there is no date of when it was entered, but that he will be getting some paperwork.  So again, I called the Las Vegas office of the Parole Board.

Brittney is the one I had the misfortune of speaking to today.  I told her about my previous phone call, and she told me that the notes in her computer were different from what I was telling her – particularly that I had been told that his case was missing a vote.  She said the notes said nothing about that, and that she couldn’t confirm or deny any decision, but that the decision was, in fact, made on June 17 – which means he was definitely denied.

She then went back in the notes and told me that I had called there on June 17, which was 2 days after his hearing, to get the names of the commissioners.  I told her I had not called on June 17, and that I had called on June 24.  So, clearly even the notes entered by the receptionists or people answering the phones at the parole board office are incorrect.  On top of it, the people there don’t feel that they need to be courteous, which just adds to the pain for those of us who love someone who is incarcerated.

I understand that people in prison are judged and thought of as worthless, but I as someone who loves a person in prison have committed no crime, and though it may be hard to understand for some, I do not see my loved one as worthless.  My intention in calling the board’s office was just to get information – not to get a whole lot of attitude.  But I also got a bit more “education,” too; how can the board make reasonable decisions about serious issues like whether or not to grant parole when they can’t even enter accurate notes into their own computer system?  That minor issue is indicative of much larger and far more serious ones.  This whole experience gets uglier and uglier.

I hope an excellent, skilled attorney can help bring about some changes, because the NDOC is certainly in need of many.

Nevada Board of Parole